This Section contains articles about new Age of Sail books released or due to be released. For a list of upcoming books please view the Releases Calendar

A History of the Royal Navy : Empire and ImperialismA new hardcover book by Daniel Owen Spence, part of the A History of the Royal Navy series, is available for pre-order, Empire and Imperialism. It will be released in the UK on 30 October 2015 and in the US on 30 December 2015.

The British Empire, the largest empire in history, was fundamentally a maritime one. Britain's imperial power was inextricably tied to the strength of the Royal Navy the ability to protect and extend Britain's political and economic interests overseas, and to provide the vital bonds that connected the metropole with the colonies. This book will examine the intrinsic relationship between the Royal Navy and the empire, by examining not only the navy's expansionist role on land and sea, but also the ideological and cultural influence it exerted for both the coloniser and colonised. The navy's voyages of discovery created new scientific knowledge and inspired art, literature and film. Using the model of the Royal Navy, colonies began to develop their own navies, many of which supported the Royal Navy in the major conflicts of the twentieth century. Daniel Owen Spence here provides a history of the navy's role in empire from the earliest days of colonisation to the present-day Commonwealth. In doing so, he shows how the relationship between the navy and the empire played a part in shaping the globalised society we inhabit today.

Desperate MeasuresDavid O'Neil has just released a new book Desperate Measures. It is now available in paperback and for kindle download worldwide.

The French emperor Napoleon Bonaparte is at the peak of his power and wages war against the United Kingdom. A valiant fleet of British ships resist Bonaparte's onslaught and foremost in the battle is the British sloop HM Active, captained by Lieutenant Robert Salter and his courageous crew. Not only must they contend with the French navy but that of Spain as well. Throw in a few unmitigated scoundrels, a renegade pirate crew or two, and corrupt government officials in the foreign ports where they must land espionage agents and you have the ingredients of another masterpiece by the superb raconteur of naval warfare David O'Neil, in his latest work that will hold the reader in rapture until final word, and clamoring for more.

Lion in the BayA new hardcover book by the late Stanley L Quick, edited by Chipp Reid, is available for pre-order, Lion in the Bay: The British Invasion of the Chesapeake, 1813-14. It will be released in the US on 15 October 2015 and in the UK on 30 October 2015.

The story of Fort McHenry's defense during the War of 1812 is well known, but "Lion in the Bay" is an intimate look at the events leading up to the battle that inspired our national anthem. As the War of 1812 raged on the high seas and along the Canadian border, the British decided to strike at the heart of the United States, the relatively undefended area of the Chesapeake Bay. The Chesapeake was a fertile farm region, a place of renowned shipbuilding, and an area politically divided over the war. Plus, if the British succeeded in taking the bay, the nation's capital was not far away. Admiral George Cockburn led the British into the bay following a failed attempt to take Norfolk, Virginia. Originally intended to relieve pressure on other fronts, the Chesapeake theater became a British campaign of retribution for the burning of York (present day Toronto) by the Americans in 1812. As a result, the Chesapeake region, once an economic engine for America, was transformed into a region of terrorized citizens, destroyed farms, and fears of slave insurrection. In August 1814, President James Madison refused to bolster the defenses on the waterway that led to Washington, and the British took advantage. Cockburn again led a naval force into the bay, this time running into opposition from Commo. Joshua Barney and his Chesapeake Bay Flotilla. Barney put up a heroic, though doomed fight before the British sailed up the Patuxent River and landed at Benedict, Maryland, where over 4,000 troops disembarked to begin their advance toward Washington, D.C. After defeating the Americans at the Battle of Bladensburg, the British moved into Washington, burning the city, before returning to their boats and setting out for Baltimore. There, the British armada encountered a stalwart group of American defenders at Fort McHenry. Despite a massive bombardment, Baltimore's defenses held, forcing the British to abandon their campaign to close the Chesapeake. More than just an in-depth look at one front of the War of 1812, "Lion in the Bay" is a story of resilience and triumph in the wake of catastrophe.

In Nelson's WakeAuthor James Davey has a new book in hardcover available for pre-order, In Nelson's Wake: The Navy and the Napoleonic Wars .It will be released in the UK on 15 October 2015 and in the US on 17 March 2016.

Horatio Nelson's celebrated victory over the French at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805 presented Britain with an unprecedented command of the seas. Yet the Royal Navy's role in the struggle against Napoleonic France was far from over. This groundbreaking book asserts that, contrary to the accepted notion that the Battle of Trafalgar essentially completed the Navy's task, the war at sea actually intensified over the next decade, ceasing only with Napoleon's final surrender. In this dramatic account of naval contributions between 1803 and 1815, James Davey offers original and exciting insights into the Napoleonic wars and Britain's maritime history. Encompassing Trafalgar, the Peninsular War, the War of 1812, the final campaign against Napoleon, and many lesser known but likewise crucial moments, the book sheds light on the experiences of individuals high and low, from admiral and captain to sailor and cabin boy. The cast of characters also includes others from across Britain-dockyard workers, politicians, civilians-who made fundamental contributions to the war effort and in so doing, both saved the nation and shaped Britain's history.

HMS Pickle: The Swiftest Ship in Nelson's Trafalgar FleetAuthor Peter Hore has a new book in hardcover available for pre-order, HMS Pickle: The Swiftest Ship in Nelson's Trafalgar Fleet .It will be released in the UK on 5 October 2015 and in the US on 15 October 2015.

The smallest ship in Nelson’s fleet at the Battle of Trafalgar was the curiously-named HMS Pickle. The ship was a topsail schooner and, though deemed too small to take part in the fighting it distinguished itself as the ship to bring Captain John Lapenotiere with the news of Nelson’s victory at Trafalgar and his death. The schooner set off on October 26th and took 9 days to reach Britain after facing a gale off Cape Finisterre. After the Pickle anchored in Falmouth Bay on November 4th Lapenotiere started his journey to London (a trip that usually took a week was covered in 37 hours with 19 horse changes). Captain Peter Hore describes the ship’s beginnings as a civilian vessel called Sting, through conversion with 10 guns and its role with Admiral Cornwall’s Inshore Squadron for French reconnaissance in 1803. HMS Pickle was also involved in the rescue for the crew of HMS Magnificent in 1804 and further reconnaissance missions. This full history details other colourful episodes including a single-ship action against the French privateer Favorite in 1807. Pickle was wrecked in July 1808 when she was grounded as she entered Cadiz harbour but without loss of life. The Pickle’s journey is commemorated by Royal Navy Warrant Officers on November 5th.

A History of the Royal Navy: The Seven Years WarMartin Robson has a new book available for pre-order in Hardcover, A History of the Royal Navy: The Seven Years War. It will be released worldwide on 30 September 2015.

The Seven Years War (1756-1763) was the first global conflict and became the key factor in creating the British Empire. This book looks at Britain's maritime strategic, operational and tactical success (and failures), through a wide-ranging history of the Royal Navy's role in the war. By the end of the war in 1763 Britain was by no means a hegemonic power, but it was the only state capable of sustained global power projection on a global scale. Key to Britain's success was political and strategic direction from London, through the war planning of Pitt the Elder and the successful implementation of his policies by a stellar cast of naval and military leaders at an operational and tactical level. Martin Robson highlights the work of some of the key protagonists in the Royal Navy, such as Admiral Hawke whose appreciation of the wider strategic context at Quiberon Bay in 1759 decided the fate of North America, but he also provides insights into the experience of life in the lower decks at this time. Robson ultimately shows that the creation, containment and expansion of the British Empire was made possible by the exercise of maritime power through the Royal Navy.

Brewer's Luck: Hornblower's LegacyJames Keffer has just released the first book in a proposed new series about an officer under the patronage of Admiral Hornblower, Brewer's Luck: Hornblower's Legacy. It is now available for kindle download worldwide and will be available in paperback shortly.

After gaining valuable experience as an aide to Governor Lord Horatio Hornblower, William Brewer is rewarded with a posting as first lieutenant on the frigate HMS Defiant, bound for American waters. Early in their travels, it seems as though Brewer’s greatest challenge will be evading the wrath of a tyrannical captain who has taken an active dislike to him. But when a hurricane sweeps away the captain, the young lieutenant is forced to assume command of the damaged ship, and a crew suffering from low morale.

Brewer reports their condition to Admiral Hornblower, who orders them into the Caribbean to destroy a nest of pirates hidden among the numerous islands. Luring the pirates out of their coastal lairs will be difficult enough; fighting them at sea could bring disaster to the entire operation. For the Defiant to succeed, Brewer must rely on his wits, his training, and his ability to shape a once-ragged crew into a coherent fighting force.

Sailors on the RocksPeter C. Smith has a new book available for pre-order in Hardcover, Sailors on the Rocks: Famous Royal Navy Shipwrecks. It will be released on 30 September 2015 in the UK and on 19 December 2015 in the US.

For three hundred years or more the Royal Navy really did "Rule the Waves", in the sense that during the numerous wars with our overseas enemies, British fleets and individual ships more often than not emerged victorious from combat. One French Admiral was to generously acknowledge that the Royal Navy possessed, "a tradition of victory." And yet, in every other way, the waves were never ruled by any maritime power. Great fleets might wax and wane, ships grow ever more complex and powerful, but the sea, the eternally cruel sea, was always to have the final say.

This book highlights a sample array of disasters, occurring when men-of-war faced the ultimate test of the elements and lost. Among such tragedies are the wrecking of the Coronation in 1691, the destruction of the Winchester in 1695 and the great storm of 1703, along with a host of shipwrecks on far-flung shores from New Zealand to Nova Scotia, and from Florida to South Africa. Some of the featured stories are already famous, like that of the Birkenhead. Others are lesser-known, like the sister cruisers Raleigh and Effingham, separated by many years. More recently, steam power replaced the uncertainties of sail, but even so losses continued, from little destroyers in both world wars (Narborough, Opal and Sturdy among them) through great battleships like Montagu. Even modern warships equipped with every modern navigational device come to grief; witness the strange affair of the frigate Nottingham, or the humiliating grounding of the nuclear 'wonder' submarine Astute on Skye in 2010. This unique book presents a fascinating insight into the malevolent power of the sea and storms over man's creation and dominion, chronicling some of the most dramatic shipwrecks ever to have occurred in our seas.

© 2008-2015 David Hayes (Astrodene)