Non-Fiction Releases

 

This section lists upcoming and recently released non-fiction books about the Age of Sail. They will also appear in the Non-Fiction Listings

The Struggle for Sea PowerSam Willis has a new book available for pre-order in Hardcover, The Struggle for Sea Power: A Naval History of the American Revolution. It will be released in the US on 15 February 2016 and in the UK on 11 March 2016.

The American Revolution was a naval war of immense scope, embroiling twenty-two navies fighting on five oceans. Britain alone launched simultaneous campaigns in the English Channel, the North and Mid-Atlantic, the Mediterranean, the Indian Ocean, the Caribbean, the Pacific, the North Sea, and, of course, the Eastern Seaboard of America. Not until World War II would a single nation fight in so many different theaters. If the British had had the luxury of focusing on their American problem alone, the outcome would have been quite different. But it was thought that losing Jamaica to the Spanish or India to the French would have been much more crippling to the British economy than losing the American colonies.

The Struggle for Sea Power bristles with stunning reversals of fortune and desperate naval encounters. Readers will come away from it with a profound understanding of this global war, of the rise and fall of the British Empire, and of the way in which seapower shaped our world. 8 pages of color illustrations

Mary Rose Owners' Workshop ManualBrian Lavery has a new book available for pre-order in Hardcover, Mary Rose Owners' Workshop Manual: King henry VIII's Warship 1510-45. It will be released worldwide on 15 December 2015.

Insights into the construction, operation, rescue and restoration of a great Tudor ship and its contents.

From the time that King Henry VIII's warship Mary Rose was raised from the Solent in 1982 after 437 years on the seabed, to the present day, she has been constantly in the public eye. In 2013 a state-of-the-art new museum opened at Portsmouth to show off the ship in conjunction with the thousands of artefacts in context with their Tudor owners and their locations onboard. The Mary Rose and her fascinating time capsule of life in Tudor times form the centrepiece of this unique Haynes manual.

The U.S. Navy: A Concise HistoryA new hardcover book by Craig L. Symonds is available for pre-order, The U.S. Navy: A Concise History. It will be released in the US on 25 November 2015 and in the UK on 1 January 2016.

This fast-paced narrative traces the emergence of the United States Navy as a global power from its birth during the American Revolution through to its current superpower status. The story highlights iconic moments of great drama pivotal to the nation's fortunes: John Paul Jones' attacks on the British in the Revolution, the Barbary Wars, and the arduous conquest of Iwo Jima.

The book illuminates the changes--technological, institutional, and functional--of the U.S. Navy from its days as a small frigate navy through the age of steam and steel to the modern era of electronics and missiles. Historian Craig L. Symonds captures the evolving culture of the Navy and debates between policymakers about what role the institution should play in world affairs. Internal and external challenges dramatically altered the size and character of the Navy, with long periods of quiet inertia alternating with rapid expansion emerging out of crises. The history of the navy reflects the history of the nation as a whole, and its many changes derive in large part from the changing role of the United States itself.

HMS Victory Pocket Manual 1805: Nelson's Flagship at TrafalgarA new hardcover book by Peter Goodwin is available for pre-order, HMS Victory Pocket Manual 1805: Nelson's Flagship at Trafalgar. It will be released in the UK on 19 November 2015 and in the US on 15 December 2015.

The full history of the world's most famous warship told in the most accessible pocket-book format and written by the leading historian of the sailing man of war. Includes a pertinent and varied selection of contemporary documents and records to explain the day-to-day running of a three-decker Georgian warship This new addition to the best-selling Conway Pocket-book range features Admiral Nelson's fully preserved flagship HMS Victory, the most tangible symbol of the Royal Navy's greatest battle off Cape Trafalgar on October 21st 1805.

In the HMS Victory Pocket Manual, Peter Goodwin adopts a fresh approach to explain the workings of the only surviving 'line of battle' ship of the Napoleonic Wars. As Victory was engaged in battle during only two per cent of her active service, Peter Goodwin also provides a glimpse into life and work at sea during the other ninety-eight per cent of the time. As technical and historical advisor to the ship in Portsmouth for over twenty years, he is in a unique position to investigate and interpret not only the ship's structure but also the essential aspects of shipboard life: victualling, organisation, discipline, domestic arrangements and medical care.

In his role as Keeper and Curator of the ship, the author was asked thousands of questions by visitors and historians alike. This volume presents answer to the most important and telling questions: 'What types of wood were used in building Victory?'; 'What was Victory's longest voyage?'; 'How many shots were fired from her guns at Trafalgar?'; 'How many boats did Victory carry?'; 'What was prize money?'; 'What was grog?'; 'When did her career as a fighting ship end?', and 'How many people visit Victory each year?'.

Great South LandRob Mundle has a new book available for pre-order on Kindle, Great South Land: How Dutch Sailors Found Australia but Lost it to a British Pirate. It will be released worldwide on 1 November 2015.

For many, the colonial story of Australia starts with Captain Cook's discovery of the east coast in 1770, but it was some 164 years before his historic voyage that European mariners began their romance with the immensity of the Australian continent. Between 1606 and 1688, while the British had their hands full with the Gunpowder Plot and the English Civil War, it was highly skilled Dutch seafarers who, by design, chance or shipwreck, discovered and mapped the majority of the vast, unknown waters and land masses in the Indian and Southern Oceans.

This is the setting that sees Rob Mundle back on the water with another sweeping and powerful account of Australian maritime history. It is the story of 17th-century European mariners - sailors, adventurers and explorers - who became transfixed by the idea of the existence of a Great South Land: 'Terra Australis Incognita'. Rob takes you aboard the tiny ship, Duyfken, in 1606 when Dutch navigator and explorer, Willem Janszoon, and his 20-man crew became the first Europeans to discover Australia on the coast of the Gulf of Carpentaria. In the decades that followed, more Dutch mariners, like Hartog, Tasman, and Janszoon (for a second time), discovered and mapped the majority of the coast of what would become Australia. Yet, incredibly, the Dutch made no effort to lay claim to it, or establish any settlements. This process began with British explorer and former pirate William Dampier on the west coast in 1688, and by the time Captain Cook arrived in 1770, all that was to be done was chart the east coast and claim what the Dutch had discovered.

© 2008-2016 David Hayes (Astrodene)