Age of Sail Naval Non-Fiction Section

Battles

Biographical

Famous Ships

Ships & Design

General

The naval mutiny of 1797 is the most astonishing recorded in British history; astonishing by its management rather than by its results, for other mutinies had been successful. Though it shook the country from end to end, it was largely ordered with rigid discipline, a respect for officers and an unswerving loyalty to the King. Moreover, it was so rationally grounded that it not only achieved its immediate end, the betterment of the sailor's lot, but also began a new and lasting epoch in naval administration. Here are familiar names: the aged hero Lord Howe, the indecisive Lord Bridport, the giant Admiral Duncan who held a mutineer over the side of his ship until the wretch admitted his error, the ever unpopular Captain Bligh, and less familiar figures such as Richard Parker, who led the mutiny at the Nore and paid for his insurrection at the end of a rope. This fascinating account will appeal to all who love Horatio Hornblower, Jack Aubrey and other fictional heroes of the era. The value of The Floating Republic does not merely reside in its excellent treatment of its theme - but likewise in the light it sheds upon the history of the eighteenth century generally.

The Floating Republic: An Account of the Mutinies at Spithead and the Nore in 1797

Author: George Ernest Manwaring & Bonamy Dobrée

Title: The Floating Republic: An Account of the Mutinies at Spithead and the Nore in 1797

Series:

First Published by: F. Cass

Place:

Format: HC

Date: 1935

ISBN-10:

ISBN-13:

amazoncouk

amazoncom

© 2008-2020 David Hayes (Astrodene)