Age of Sail Naval Non-Fiction Section

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AOS Naval Non Fiction - Famous Ships

Non-Fiction books which are about specific famous ships from the Age of Sail.

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Author :: Richard Endsor
First Published by :: Conway
Format :: HC
Date :: 23 February 2017
ISBN-10 :: 1844864391
ISBN-13 :: 9781844864393

The Warship AnneIf you go down to the shore at Hastings on the UK's south coast at low tide you will come upon an amazing sight. There, revealed by the receding waves are the remarkably complete mortal remains of a seventeenth century warship. The Anne was launched in 1678 and was lost in 1690 at the battle of Beachy Head. As she lay beached, she was torched to prevent her from falling into enemy hands. Today the wreck is owned by the Shipwreck Museum at Hastings and in the past few years there have been some intriguing attempts to bring the ship back to life using advanced simulation and modeling techniques. Ship's historian and draughtsman Richard Endsor has written a history of this wonderful and accessible ship, bringing the ship fully back to life using his beautiful and accurate drawings and paintings. Richard Endsor's previous book, The Restoration Warship inspired the locals at Deptford to plan a full size replica of Lenox, the warship covered in that book.

Author :: Mark Lardas
Series :: Duel
First Published by :: Osprey Publishing
Format :: PB
Date :: 18 May 2017
ISBN-10 :: 1472815823
ISBN-13 :: 9781472815828

The most critical naval fighting during the War of 1812 took place, not on the high seas, but on the inland lakes of North America: the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain. Carrying between 12 and 22 cannon, the British and American sloops-of-war were ship-rigged, brig-rigged or schooner-rigged vessels. Lakes actions often involved two ships facing each other broadside to broadside, the best example of which was the battle of Lake Erie in 1813 where HMS Detroit led a Royal Navy squadron against the USS Lawrence-led US Navy.

Featuring full-colour artwork, this lively study investigates the prolonged struggle between British and US sloops-of-war, highlighting the differences between the war on the lakes and the war on the oceans during the Age of Fighting Sail. It reveals the circumstances under which these ships were built, how they were armed, and the human story behind their construction and use in battle.

USS Lawrence vs HMS Detroit: The War of 1812 on the Great Lakes

Author :: Jim Stempel
First Published by :: Mcfarland
Format :: PB
Date :: 2 September 2011
ISBN-10 :: 0786465298
ISBN-13 :: 9780786465293

On October 27, 1864, two marvels of the Civil War collided on the Roanoke River near Plymouth, North Carolina. The first was the formidable Confederate ironclad Albemarle, a 376-ton behemoth that had for months roamed the nearby rivers and waters of Albemarle Sound, defeating in turn everything the Federal Navy could throw at it. The second was William B. Cushing, a 21-year-old Federal naval lieutenant who had been selected to lead a virtual suicide mission to destroy the ironclad in her berth. This chronicle of the young officer's "David vs. Goliath" victory over the daunting ironclad presents a tale of courage and accomplishment.

The CSS Albemarle and William Cushing

Author :: Tom Chaffin
First Published by :: Hill & Wang
Format :: HC
Date :: 24 January 2006
ISBN-10 :: 0809095114
ISBN-13 :: 9780809095117
The sleek, 222-foot, black auxiliary steamer Sea King left London on October 8, 1864, ostensibly bound for Bombay. The subterfuge was ended off the shores of Madeira, where the ship was outfitted for war. The newly christened CSS Shenandoah then commenced the last, most quixotic sea story of the Civil War: the 58,000-mile, around-the-world cruise of the Confederacy's second most successful commerce raider. Before its voyage was over, thirty-two Union merchant and whaling ships and their cargoes would be destroyed. But it was only after ship and crew embarked on the last leg of their journey that the excursion took its most fearful turn.

Four months after the Civil War was over, the Shenandoah's Captain Waddell finally learned he was, and had been, fighting without cause or state. In the eyes of the world, he had gone from being an enemy combatant to being a pirate--a hangable offense. Now fearing capture and mutiny, with supplies quickly dwindling, Waddell elected to camouflage the ship, circumnavigate the globe, and attempt to surrender on English soil.

Sea of Gray

On 26 October 1812, during the war between Britain and the United States, the frigate USS Essex set sail on the most remarkable voyage in the early history of the US navy. After rounding Cape Horn, she proceeded to systematically destroy the British South Seas whaling fleet. When news reached the Royal Navy's South American station at Rio de Janeiro, HMS Phoebe was sent off in pursuit. So began one of the most extraordinary chases in naval history. In Pursuit of the Essex follows the adventures of both hunter and hunted as well as a host of colourful characters that crossed their paths. Traitorous Nantucket whalers, Chilean revolutionaries, British spies, a Peruvian viceroy and bellicose Polynesian islanders all make an appearance. The brilliant yet vainglorious Captain Porter of the Essex, his nemesis Captain James Hillyar of the Phoebe, and two young midshipmen, David Farragut and Allen Gardiner, are the principal narrators. From giant-tortoise turning expeditions on the Galapagos to the perils of rounding Cape Horn, via desperate skirmishes with spear-toting natives on the Marquesas and a defeated duellist bleeding his life out onto black, volcanic sands, the reader is immersed in the fantastical world of the British and American seamen who struggled for supremacy over the world's oceans in the sunset years of the age of sail. Ben Hughes's graphic account is a work of non-fiction, yet reads like a novel, from the opening view of the Essex preparing for her cruise on the Delaware River to the story's bloody denouement in Valparaiso Bay.

In Pursuit of the Essex: Heroism and Hubris on the High Seas in the War of 1812

  For more than 150 years it was the world’s most powerful force: between victory at Trafalgar in 1805 and the withdrawal from ‘east of Suez’ in the 1960s, the ships of the Royal Navy were ubiquitous. From Newfoundland to New South Wales and Cyprus to Ceylon, the Royal Navy was there, protecting British interests, projecting British power and maintaining British prestige. An Act of Parliament laid down that the Royal Navy had to maintain a number of battleships at least equal to the combined strength of the next two largest navies in the world and in addition to this, shipyards up and down the land were sending the most technologically advanced vessels of the age down their slipways. In this readable and informative book, John Ballard tells the story of ten of the most significant ships in the Royal Navy, from HMS Victory, Nelson’s flagship at Trafalgar, to HMS Invincible, the key ship of the Falklands War. In between there are the stories of a variety of ships that encompass the era of the Royal Navy’s global pre-eminence and Pax Britannica, two world wars, the Cold War and the complex post-Cold War era. 10 Greatest Ships of the Royal Navy

© 2008-2019 David Hayes (Astrodene)